Why Should You Ask Follow-Up Questions During A Peer Review Employee Engagement – Competence Trust and Confidence Trust – Why Leaders Need Both

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Employee Engagement – Competence Trust and Confidence Trust – Why Leaders Need Both

Pick up any business publication today and you’ll likely see at least one article on the topic of employee engagement. Employee engagement is the degree to which employees work with passion and feel a deep connection with their company. Gallup International recently reported that companies with the 24% highest employee engagement had lower turnover and higher percentages of customer loyalty, profitability and revenue.

Employee engagement research further states that trust in the workplace is the foundation of employee engagement. If this is true, it would be useful to get a better idea of ​​what really constitutes trust between employees and managers or organizations.

In today’s organization, trust is a two-way street. Employees want to work for a manager and for an organization they can trust, and managers want to trust their employees. The problem is that trust is a nebulous concept – much like honesty, energy and commitment. We value these qualities in our employees and colleagues, but we don’t all agree on what constitutes them. Many of us say, “We’ll know when we see it,” or “I trust everyone until they prove me wrong.”

One useful way to define “trust” is to segment it into two types of trust: confidence trust and competence trust. Trust is said to be the belief that you can count on another person to do the right thing or act in a positive, ethical way. On the other hand, “competency confidence” is a belief in a person’s ability to do a job or complete a task. Confidence in competence can be synonymous with one’s “abilities”. Confidence and trust is synonymous with one’s “willingness to do the right thing”.

Let’s look at some examples.

Phil has been a project manager in a financial institution for 10 years. He was a strong performer and known for his hard work, excellent communication skills and highly professional demeanor. When a recently hired vice president wanted to add project managers to her team, she interviewed multiple candidates and chose Phil. Phil’s reputation preceded him, and the VP believed that Phil would continue to be the best. Phil did not disappoint, and at the annual performance review the vice president stated that Phil exceeded the standards for this position. She rewarded Phil financially and with a nomination for the Leadership Team Award — a prestigious honor given annually to employees who represent the company’s core values. Phil enjoyed both confidence that the new vice president was willing to believe in him, “unprecedented,” and confidence in his competence in the sense that he continued to demonstrate his abilities throughout the year.

Likewise, the vice president enjoyed Phil’s confidence—both in his competence as a manager to set expectations, hold employees accountable for results, measure those results, and reward performance with financial and meaningful recognition, and in her confidence that he could and would do “as advertised.”

In this example, the trust each person placed in the other was appropriate, and the end result was a win for both the employee and the manager.

Often, however, this is not the case. Consider what happened when Emily, a highly experienced researcher in the pharmaceutical industry, took on a new role at a company in her field. While Emily continued to work to her high standards, her manager spent much more time with her weaker teammates. He reasoned how to help these employees improve their performance and tried to provide detailed coaching for each of them. When Emily asked her manager to provide peer review feedback on several papers she was writing, he agreed, but was always busy or involved with her teammates when Emily asked him to review her paper. In addition, her manager was either chronically late to the team meetings he called or missed them altogether when something else came up. Although Emily accepted her position, partly because of her manager’s professional reputation, she began to wonder if he was really up to date with the latest scientific research. When it came time for Emily’s annual performance review, Emily received very positive feedback on her performance and a very good raise. Her manager definitely had confidence in Emily’s competence to demonstrate strong abilities, and acted as if he had confidence that she would continue to do so, with little or no supervision. What he didn’t realize, however, was that Emily’s trust in him—both in performing his managerial role and in caring for Emily and her work—was eroding.

The employer/employee compact that depends so much on trust will likely continue to be healthy in Phil’s case. However, in Emily’s case, she may begin to question why she joined this company if she has little or no confidence in her manager to provide her with what she needs to continue to be successful in her job.

What can we learn from the situations involving Phil and Emily, and how can managers ensure that they and their employees display both types of trust?

Communication is really the key to building trust. As a manager, if you set specific, measurable expectations, provide both positive and corrective feedback, understand your employees’ goals and motivations, and recognize and reward superior results, you are well on your way to gaining or maintaining employee trust in you as a competent manager. It is especially important to be mindful of providing feedback to high performers as well as those who are challenged. And if you promise something to an employee–“do what you said you would do.” That will garner more respect than anything else you can do.

Employees will be much more inclined to have a positive and energetic view of their work if they trust their managers. However, in that two-way street, employees also need to make sure they demonstrate their capabilities, ask for feedback, ask how they can help the company be even more successful, and help their managers understand what they need to be successful.

So, as you think more about that elusive concept of “trust,” ask yourself, “How do you show your employees trust in trust and trust in competence?” Now think about how your employees would answer these questions about themselves and you. Better yet, go ask them!

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